Use the links below to learn how to write an annotated bibliography.

If the author is addressing an unusual audience or the intended audience impacted the nature of the information used in the article, you should mention the intended audience in your annotation. You may also want to include this if the author’s style makes the work easier or harder for potential readers to understand. (For example, if you’re writing an annotated bibliography evaluating sources for high school students, you should make note of works that are particularly dense reads.)

• University of Toronto: Writing an Annotated Bibliography:

is to decide which sources will be most critical for your topic. Often, your professor will assign an annotated bibliography relatively early on in the writing process, so perhaps you do not yet know exactly which sources will be the most important or how exactly you will use them. To help you figure that out, think about the research questions that led you to your topic in the first place and then think about which sources would best help you answer those questions. A major benefit of writing an annotated bibliography is that, by the end of it, you will have a far better idea of what your project looks like, what you are arguing, and what evidence you have to support your argument.


Why should I write an annotated bibliography?

Here are some useful links for how to write an Annotated Bibliography.

How to write an annotated bibliography pictures 1 How to write an annotated bibliography pictures 2 How to write an annotated bibliography pictures 3 How to write an annotated bibliography pictures 4 How to write an annotated bibliography pictures 5