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Several Albright professors have influenced Dietrich, who says he plans to incorporate their teaching styles into his own. Dietrich recalls Christopher Catone, Ph.D., and his passion for math, and the support provided by Brian Buerke, Ph.D., particularly during his "Quantum Physics" class sophomore year. "He let me sit in his office for entire days while figuring out a quantum physics problem," Dietrich says.

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Quantum Physics Problem Proved Unsolvable | Eurasia Review

Quantum physics problem proved unsolvable - UCL Engineering

Sean McCleese: I went to Occidental College in Los Angeles, and I was a physics major. I remember in my senior level quantum physics class, there were ten people in the class. Homework was due every day or two, and since it was a senior level class, I couldn't find a person who could help me, because they had all graduated. One homework assignment I particularly remember, no one in the class could figure out how to do. The professor had gone home already, so I started to look online. Unfortunately, I couldn't just do a search for the equation, and I didn't need an hour of tutoring, and didn't want to hire a tutor for an hour. More to the point, even if I found a tutor online, I had no idea if they were good at physics, or at quantum physics, or that specific quantum physics problem. Someone who might be good at math might not remember how to do that specific problem. I realized that most students have a problem with maybe one or two things at a time--it's rare that someone needs all of geometry. Along with a that realization, I knew there were a bunch of kids in school, who were really experts--but were living on ramen and french fries, because they didn't have any extra spending money. They had no way to monetize the content. It was very important to me, to not only get help when you need it, but also give students the opportunity to earn significant money--extra money to supplement, or even supplant a full time job.